Reporting from the 504 — Singapore Eco Film Festival

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Happy to announce our latest partnership with the Turtle Survival Alliance (TSA)! TSA works around the world to save critically endangered turtle species. I was lucky enough to attend the 14th Annual Symposium on the Conservation & Biology of Tortoises & Freshwater Turtles in New Orleans Jacqui, look! Henry sneaked in and made a lot…

via Reporting from the 504 — Singapore Eco Film Festival

Spiders, Bats Herps, Birds! Upcoming Surveys @ the Singapore Zoo – Oct & Nov

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Contact Paige for more info

3 spaces left for the Citizens Action for Tigers Trek – 22 to 25 Sept 2016, Malaysia

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3 places left in the upcoming CAT walk. Support tiger conservation and get the chance to walk where tigers still roam! If you can’t make it to this one, the next one is in Nov.

What is CAT?

The Citizen Action for Tigers (CAT) program involves participants walking on the trails where the Malayan Tiger and other wildlife have been recorded. Since 2010, more than 200 CAT walks have been done by more than a thousand volunteer participants from over 31 countries. The CAT program is run by the Malaysian Conservation Alliance for Tigers (MYCAT).

Malayan Tiger Corridor Trek Trip

For this 4 Day 3 Night trip – Thursday 22 to Sunday 25 September 2016:

Cost per adult/non-student, based on a group of 8 pax = RM$960 (S$320)

Cost per adult/non-student, based on a group of 7 pax = RM$1097 (S$366)

Cost per adult/non-student, based on a group of 6 pax = RM$1280 (S$426)

Cost per student/repeat cat walker, based on a group of 8 pax = RM$720 (S$240)

Cost includes car transfers KL-Merapoh, guided treks, night drive, and village guesthouse accomodation.

Cost excludes coach Singapore-KL, and meals.

Why Support CAT?

In Peninsular Malaysia, there were about 3000 Malayan Tigers  in the 1950s. Presently there are less than 300 individuals. This sub-species is now on the extreme edge of extinction.

The presence of walkers on these trails will discourage illegal and destructive activities such as:

-poaching of wildlife

-cutting of forest trees

-burning of forest

-clearing forest for illegal plantation


Our survey walks will:

-report on animal snares and traps encountered so that they can be de-activated

-submit evidence of wildlife poaching activities encountered to the Wildlife Crime Hotline so that they can be investigated and stopped

-look for signs of wildlife such as Sun bear claw marks on trees, tiger paw prints and hoof marks on the trails, and observing wildlife encountered while on the trek.

-we support the local Batek Orang Asli native people community by engaging them as our guides.


Itinerary & program:
Day 1 Thursday 22 Sept:

8.00am – Board coach to KL

1.00pm – Arrive in KL, have lunch.

2.00pm – Pick up by van transfer to Merapoh, Sungei Yu.

5.00pm – Check-in village guest house.

7.00pm – Dinner in village


Day 2 Friday 23 Sept:

7.30am – Breakfast in village, pack lunch to go on whole day survey-trek.

8.00am – Leave for tiger survey-trek Trail 1

4.00pm – Back in village

7.00pm – Dinner in Gua Musang (Civet Cave) town


Day 3 Saturday 24 Sept:

7.30am – Breakfast in village

8.00am – Leave for tiger survey-trek Trail 2

1.00pm – Back in village for lunch

2.00pm – Visit MYCAT Sungei Yu Reforestation Site (refer below for details on our fun activities there)

7.00pm – Dinner in village

8.00pm – Night drive to look for wildlife

11.00pm – Back in village house


Day 4 Sunday 25 Sept:
7.30am – Breakfast in village

9.00am – Leave for KL

2.00pm – Arrive at KL coach station, lunch

3.30pm – Board coach for Singapore (actual time to be confirmed)

9.00pm – Arrive in Singapore


Visit to the reforestation site:

The MYCAT reforestation project site was recently launched on 29 July 2016. The site is under a portion of the longest elevated viaduct at Sungei Yu. The aim is to cover the de-forested site with native vegetation to encourage wildlife to use it as a green corridor to travel between the Titiwangsa central forests and Taman Negara. Participants will get a crash course on how to hands-on do maintenance on such a site to ensure the planted vegetation will survive and grow, and learn about native plants and their specific symbiosis with wildlife. We may also get to do some planting at the site with saplings sourced from the nursery of the Batek Orang Asli village nearby.


To join the trip, contact MYCAT:

Joint Master of Science in Communication – NUS & ANU

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The NUS-ANU Joint M.Sc. in Science Communication aims to foster in its participants the skills necessary to:

  • be competent, confident, effective communicators of science and technology to the general public and school-age audiences
  • develop materials for effective communication to non-specific audiences
  • propose and supervise project work and other scientific activities
  • develop strong lifelong learning habits

Applicants seeking admission to the course for the NUS-ANU Joint M.Sc. degree program in Science Communication must have a Bachelor degree in Science with Honours (or equivalent) from a reputable university.

Real Life Pokemon of Singapore – Sean Yap

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Besides otters, Singapore has plenty of wildlife to look out for instead of virtual cartoons. Sean Yap, a student at NUS, started the Real Life Pokemon of Singapore page to show the cooler and real life versions of Pokemon characters. Here are some of my favourites:

Sandslash // Pangolin



Ferroseed // Durian
From Sean “Paras & Parasect are cicada nymphs infected by Cordyceps fungus. Ever noticed that when Paras evolves into Parasect, its eyes become all blank and possessed-looking? If you thought the pokemon you were training was a bug, guess again – it was a fungus the whole time! Zombies may not walk among us yet, but they sure plague the insect kingdom. Most fungi obtain their nutrients from decaying organisms, but Cordyceps prey on insects that are still alive and kicking – they NEED to. What the diabolical fungus does when a spore lands on an insect is to send its root-like mycelium into the insect, invading and eventually replacing host tissue. Some of these have the ability to alter the insects’ behaviour, encouraging them to climb to higher ground and hang on to an exposed branch with the last of their strength in order to put the growing fungus in the optimal position to spread its spores and further infect other insects. For every group of insect there is, there is likely a specific cordyceps species that targets it. Thankfully, this hasn’t latched on to mammals yet, otherwise a zombie outbreak would be VERY real (this is the entire premise of the game The Last of Us). “


Click here for the full Straits Times article on Sean and his love of Pokemon and nature.