Open Science

Microbial March for the Free Movement of Cultures – Thurs 9 March @ ArtScience Museum

Posted on Updated on

No automatic alt text available.

“Microbial March” is a living fermentation lab that invites everyone to come and learn about the art and science of food fermentation and to reconnect with their bodies and their environment through microbes.

Fermentation – a metabolic process that converts sugar to acids, gases, and alcohols by using microbial cultures (so-called “fermentation starter cultures”) – has been known as a traditional food making technique since the Neolithic Age.

After a short introductory talk about microbes + fermentation and their social, environmental, and health impacts, lab visitors will be invited to engage in a collaborative hands-on making of various cultured foods and drinks.

Everyone is welcomed to bring and share fermentation ingredients, starter cultures, as well as traditional fermentation wisdom and recipes known in their country, neighborhood or family. Along with the exchange of various cultures, both in the literal and metaphorical sense, we will discuss various fermentation-related issues as well as the globally growing inter-cultural tensions.
The event is co-organized by the FabCafe Singapore, The Singapore Eco Film Festival and the Fermentation GutHub group.

Time: 730 to 930 pm

Venue: ArtScience Museum

Program:

#1 Fermented Discussion & Speculation
Introduced by Adeline Seah (The Singapore Eco Film Festival), Markéta Dolejšová (Fermentation GutHub) & Philip Johns (Yale-NUS College)

#2 (Starter) Culture Exchange
There will be milk kefir grains from New Zealand; various yeasts from USA; kombucha SCOBYs from Singapore; and some random surprise starters + everyone is invited to bring samples of fermentation cultures, foods, drinks, recipes, ideas etc.

#3 Make Your Own Jar (Hands-on Workshop)
Collaborative hands-on fermentation: Basic vegetable pickling + yogurt & milk kefir making + kombucha brewing etc.

We will experiment with different teas and sugar levels (kombucha), salt ratios (veggies), additional ingredients (e.g. mango in kefir). The finished jars can stay in Fab Café to sit and ferment (there will be a follow-up tasting session in 2 weeks – exact date TBC). Everyone is also welcomed to bring her/his jars home of course!

#4. Fermented Dancefloor & Late Night Fermentation Vibes (**Free Movement of Cultures**)
Playlist under construction -> add your ideas here: http://bit.ly/2lYI0cT

Entry is free —> BYOjars, foods, cultures, and other friends

 

For more info and updates: https://www.facebook.com/events/1275463755881579/

 

500womenscientists: Working to Empower Women in Science

Posted on Updated on

One of the newest organizations we’re excited about, the mission of 500 Women Scientists
is to promote a diverse and inclusive scientific community that brings progressive science-based solutions to local and global challenges.

What we love especially are their values, many that we share. We list theirs here and are working on ours (coming soon!):

  • Recognizing that science touches the lives of every person on this planet;
  • Advocating for a strong role of science in society;
  • Identifying and acknowledging structural inequities and biases in science;
  • Pushing for equality and standing up to inequality, discrimination, and aggression;
  • Pushing to develop and strengthen access for traditionally underrepresented groups to fully participate in and become leaders in science;
  • Supporting the education and careers of all scientists;
  • Enhancing scientific mentorship and encouraging an atmosphere of collaboration;
  • Stepping outside of our research disciplines to communicate our science and engage with the public;
  • Using the language and wonder of science to bridge the divides that separate societies and to enhance global diplomacy.

Check out the interview with Maryam Zaringhalam, a molecular biologist who describes herself as “floating at the intersection of art x science x society x advocacy x STEMinism”. She talks about her various interests and activities, and her insights as an Iranian-American on the recent travel ban. Great read!

 

Join in Panthera’s New Project to Protect Big Cats Around the World

Posted on Updated on

camcatscreenshot

From the Zooniverse folks:

Just launched, Camera CATalogue is a new website from Zooniverse and Panthera that allows citizen scientists like you to protect big cats by simply looking at and identifying photos of wildlife!

Panthera works in 50 countries around the globe to protect big cats and their vast landscapes. Motion-activated camera traps are used to count cats and their prey species, identify where they live, and determine how conservation efforts are helping to protect these animals.

These cameras produce thousands of images of fascinating animals, from the iconic leopard and rhino to the lesser-known aardwolf and civet. While certainly high-tech, these cameras do not distinguish between animal species. That is why we need your help to identify the big cats and other wildlife in these photos.

Log onto the Camera CATalogue now and help identify the amazing wildlife in these camera trap images. It’s a fun way to spend a few minutes (or a few hours), test and improve your animal knowledge (who knew what a gemsbok was?!) and support efforts to better protect leopards, other wildlife and their landscapes…without ever leaving your chair!

 

 

Citizen Science @ Bern

Posted on Updated on

Some familiar faces from Europe, cool “meeting” Hackteria friends 🙂

biodesign for the real world

What is biohacking?

Hackteria members were invited to the Swiss Citizen Science Network’s meeting “Biohacking meets Citizen Science” in Bern at Dialog Science and Society (Stiftung Science et Cité).

IMG_20160128_140536

bern 1

In the style of hackteria workshops, we started the morning hands-on.We set up the room as a temporary/mobile open source DIY bio-lab. During the round of self-introductions, we assembled gel-trays for electrophoresis. People were mainly from the German speaking parts of Switzerland, and Geneva’s Bioscope was represented – with educators, artists, biotechnologists, geologist, botanist…history of science – it was a nice atmosphere.

IMG_20160128_102027

To use some of the generic lab equipment, we decided to extract some DNA from the participants and run a genomic PCR on the serotonin transporter. This was inspired by some protocols from the Science Bar Incubator in Tokyo.

Also, genotyping ourselves is a great starting point for a range of discussions on gene <> phenotype  (can we tell…

View original post 763 more words

OpenCon -12 to 14 Nov 2016, Washington, DC

Posted on Updated on

OpenCon is the conference and community for students and early career professionals interested in advancing Open Access, Open Education and Open Data. OpenCon 2016 will be held on November 12-14 in Washington, DC. Each year, OpenCon brings together a diverse, representative, and engaged group of participants, with travel scholarships available to most participants. For this reason, attendance at OpenCon 2016 is by application only.

 

The benefits of applying for OpenCon 2016 extend far beyond attending the Washington, DC meeting. It’s an opportunity to find collaborators, get connected with scholarships to attend related conferences, and be recognized by the community for the work you do to promote Open Access, Open Education and Open Data. To find out more about OpenCon before applying, click here. To learn more about these issues, click here.

Applications are due by Monday July 11 at 11:59pm U.S. Pacific Time.

 

Alert: Handful of Biologists Went Rogue and Published Directly to Internet

Posted on Updated on

Written by Amy Harmon, the NYTimes article published yesterday describes the latest in the battle for open access science:

“On Feb. 29, Carol Greider of Johns Hopkins University became the third Nobel Prize laureate biologist in a month to do something long considered taboo among biomedical researchers: She posted a report of her recent discoveries to a publicly accessible website, bioRxiv, before submitting it to a scholarly journal to review for “official’’ publication.

It was a small act of information age defiance, and perhaps also a bit of a throwback, somewhat analogous to Stephen King’s 2000 self-publishing an e-book or Radiohead’s 2007 release of a download-only record without a label. To commemorate it, she tweeted the website’s confirmation under the hashtag #ASAPbio, a newly coined rallying cry of a cadre of biologists who say they want to speed science by making a key change in the way it is published.”

Traditional journals are going to have to deal with the growing acts of rebellion from scientists who are tired of waiting for the speed and openness of scientific research to keep pace with the 25 year old Interweb – one of the more famous open access heroines [1] being the Sci-Hub researcher from Kazakhstan (also mentioned in the article). It ends with a tweet from a long-time advocate for scientific publishing reform:

Good point.

For the entire article: http://www.nytimes.com/2016/03/16/science/asap-bio-biologists-published-to-the-internet.html?smid=pl-share&_r=0

[1] More on Alexandra Elbakyan and open access publishing in another NYtimes article, “Should all research papers be free?