science communication

Microbial March for the Free Movement of Cultures – Thurs 9 March @ ArtScience Museum

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“Microbial March” is a living fermentation lab that invites everyone to come and learn about the art and science of food fermentation and to reconnect with their bodies and their environment through microbes.

Fermentation – a metabolic process that converts sugar to acids, gases, and alcohols by using microbial cultures (so-called “fermentation starter cultures”) – has been known as a traditional food making technique since the Neolithic Age.

After a short introductory talk about microbes + fermentation and their social, environmental, and health impacts, lab visitors will be invited to engage in a collaborative hands-on making of various cultured foods and drinks.

Everyone is welcomed to bring and share fermentation ingredients, starter cultures, as well as traditional fermentation wisdom and recipes known in their country, neighborhood or family. Along with the exchange of various cultures, both in the literal and metaphorical sense, we will discuss various fermentation-related issues as well as the globally growing inter-cultural tensions.
The event is co-organized by the FabCafe Singapore, The Singapore Eco Film Festival and the Fermentation GutHub group.

Time: 730 to 930 pm

Venue: ArtScience Museum

Program:

#1 Fermented Discussion & Speculation
Introduced by Adeline Seah (The Singapore Eco Film Festival), Markéta Dolejšová (Fermentation GutHub) & Philip Johns (Yale-NUS College)

#2 (Starter) Culture Exchange
There will be milk kefir grains from New Zealand; various yeasts from USA; kombucha SCOBYs from Singapore; and some random surprise starters + everyone is invited to bring samples of fermentation cultures, foods, drinks, recipes, ideas etc.

#3 Make Your Own Jar (Hands-on Workshop)
Collaborative hands-on fermentation: Basic vegetable pickling + yogurt & milk kefir making + kombucha brewing etc.

We will experiment with different teas and sugar levels (kombucha), salt ratios (veggies), additional ingredients (e.g. mango in kefir). The finished jars can stay in Fab Café to sit and ferment (there will be a follow-up tasting session in 2 weeks – exact date TBC). Everyone is also welcomed to bring her/his jars home of course!

#4. Fermented Dancefloor & Late Night Fermentation Vibes (**Free Movement of Cultures**)
Playlist under construction -> add your ideas here: http://bit.ly/2lYI0cT

Entry is free —> BYOjars, foods, cultures, and other friends

 

For more info and updates: https://www.facebook.com/events/1275463755881579/

 

500womenscientists: Working to Empower Women in Science

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One of the newest organizations we’re excited about, the mission of 500 Women Scientists
is to promote a diverse and inclusive scientific community that brings progressive science-based solutions to local and global challenges.

What we love especially are their values, many that we share. We list theirs here and are working on ours (coming soon!):

  • Recognizing that science touches the lives of every person on this planet;
  • Advocating for a strong role of science in society;
  • Identifying and acknowledging structural inequities and biases in science;
  • Pushing for equality and standing up to inequality, discrimination, and aggression;
  • Pushing to develop and strengthen access for traditionally underrepresented groups to fully participate in and become leaders in science;
  • Supporting the education and careers of all scientists;
  • Enhancing scientific mentorship and encouraging an atmosphere of collaboration;
  • Stepping outside of our research disciplines to communicate our science and engage with the public;
  • Using the language and wonder of science to bridge the divides that separate societies and to enhance global diplomacy.

Check out the interview with Maryam Zaringhalam, a molecular biologist who describes herself as “floating at the intersection of art x science x society x advocacy x STEMinism”. She talks about her various interests and activities, and her insights as an Iranian-American on the recent travel ban. Great read!

 

COUNTDOWN to the 1st Singapore Eco Film Festival – Nov 10 to 13 @ the ArtScience Museum

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This festival is FREE and open from 1030am to 7pm, Fri Nov 10 to Sun Nov 13.

Full program is available here: SGEFF 2016 Program

Please check www.sgeff.com for updates to the program and register at http://sgeff.peatix.com for the films.

The festival has been powered by volunteers so please be patient with us! Also, volunteers still needed for this year’s fest and also next years. If you’re interested, contact adeline@sgeff.com.

Hope to see you there!

Joint Master of Science in Communication – NUS & ANU

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The NUS-ANU Joint M.Sc. in Science Communication aims to foster in its participants the skills necessary to:

  • be competent, confident, effective communicators of science and technology to the general public and school-age audiences
  • develop materials for effective communication to non-specific audiences
  • propose and supervise project work and other scientific activities
  • develop strong lifelong learning habits

Applicants seeking admission to the course for the NUS-ANU Joint M.Sc. degree program in Science Communication must have a Bachelor degree in Science with Honours (or equivalent) from a reputable university.

http://www.science.nus.edu.sg/education/graduate/pg-joint-msc-science-comm

Real Life Pokemon of Singapore – Sean Yap

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Besides otters, Singapore has plenty of wildlife to look out for instead of virtual cartoons. Sean Yap, a student at NUS, started the Real Life Pokemon of Singapore page to show the cooler and real life versions of Pokemon characters. Here are some of my favourites:

Sandslash // Pangolin

 

 

Ferroseed // Durian
From Sean “Paras & Parasect are cicada nymphs infected by Cordyceps fungus. Ever noticed that when Paras evolves into Parasect, its eyes become all blank and possessed-looking? If you thought the pokemon you were training was a bug, guess again – it was a fungus the whole time! Zombies may not walk among us yet, but they sure plague the insect kingdom. Most fungi obtain their nutrients from decaying organisms, but Cordyceps prey on insects that are still alive and kicking – they NEED to. What the diabolical fungus does when a spore lands on an insect is to send its root-like mycelium into the insect, invading and eventually replacing host tissue. Some of these have the ability to alter the insects’ behaviour, encouraging them to climb to higher ground and hang on to an exposed branch with the last of their strength in order to put the growing fungus in the optimal position to spread its spores and further infect other insects. For every group of insect there is, there is likely a specific cordyceps species that targets it. Thankfully, this hasn’t latched on to mammals yet, otherwise a zombie outbreak would be VERY real (this is the entire premise of the game The Last of Us). “

 

Click here for the full Straits Times article on Sean and his love of Pokemon and nature.

Otter Love in Singapore

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12000 readers of the Straits Times voted for the otter to be one of the 51 objects representing aspects of Singapore’s history.  Having smooth coated otters roam the urban jungles of Singapore is pretty exciting and they seem to be bringing Singaporeans a little closer to loving the wildlife we have!

Enjoy this music video made by 4 otter enthusiasts in celebration of Singapore’s 51st National Day this past 9 Aug: