undergrads

Talk – Rainforest Bird Diversity Origins in Greater Sunda Islands by Dr Fred Sheldon, Fri June 2 @ NSS Office

Posted on

This Friday we have a special guest, Dr Fred Sheldon from Louisiana State University, who will be speaking about Rainforest Bird Diversity Origins in Greater Sunda Islands. The talk will be 730pm at the Nature Society (Singapore) office. For more details, please click here.

Where do hornbills come from? Why do most endemic species occur in mountains? And what the heck is a Rail Babbler? Come meet Fred this Fri and find out likely reasons to these questions and about other birds. There will also be wine, beer and snacks if you get there early!

 

Fred and students

Frans de Waal talking about Animal Cognition and Ethics – 6 & 8 March @ Yale-NUS

Posted on Updated on

Exciting!

Frans de Waal will be visiting Yale-NUS College next week and there will be talks/discussion. Frans is a renowned primatologist and ethologist.

6th Mar 2017 – President Speaker Series (Are We Smart Enough to Know How Smart Animals Are? @1830 hrs, Performance Hall, Yale-NUS College). <http://fransdewaal.peatix.com/>

8th Mar 2017 – Panel discussion (Being human: Ethics, religion and our ancestry @ 1830 hrs; Reception: 1800 hrs, Performance Hall, Yale-NUS College). <http://beinghuman.peatix.com/>

 

“In our haste to argue that animals are not people, we have forgotten that people are animals, too.”

 

Microbial March for the Free Movement of Cultures – Thurs 9 March @ ArtScience Museum

Posted on Updated on

No automatic alt text available.

“Microbial March” is a living fermentation lab that invites everyone to come and learn about the art and science of food fermentation and to reconnect with their bodies and their environment through microbes.

Fermentation – a metabolic process that converts sugar to acids, gases, and alcohols by using microbial cultures (so-called “fermentation starter cultures”) – has been known as a traditional food making technique since the Neolithic Age.

After a short introductory talk about microbes + fermentation and their social, environmental, and health impacts, lab visitors will be invited to engage in a collaborative hands-on making of various cultured foods and drinks.

Everyone is welcomed to bring and share fermentation ingredients, starter cultures, as well as traditional fermentation wisdom and recipes known in their country, neighborhood or family. Along with the exchange of various cultures, both in the literal and metaphorical sense, we will discuss various fermentation-related issues as well as the globally growing inter-cultural tensions.
The event is co-organized by the FabCafe Singapore, The Singapore Eco Film Festival and the Fermentation GutHub group.

Time: 730 to 930 pm

Venue: ArtScience Museum

Program:

#1 Fermented Discussion & Speculation
Introduced by Adeline Seah (The Singapore Eco Film Festival), Markéta Dolejšová (Fermentation GutHub) & Philip Johns (Yale-NUS College)

#2 (Starter) Culture Exchange
There will be milk kefir grains from New Zealand; various yeasts from USA; kombucha SCOBYs from Singapore; and some random surprise starters + everyone is invited to bring samples of fermentation cultures, foods, drinks, recipes, ideas etc.

#3 Make Your Own Jar (Hands-on Workshop)
Collaborative hands-on fermentation: Basic vegetable pickling + yogurt & milk kefir making + kombucha brewing etc.

We will experiment with different teas and sugar levels (kombucha), salt ratios (veggies), additional ingredients (e.g. mango in kefir). The finished jars can stay in Fab Café to sit and ferment (there will be a follow-up tasting session in 2 weeks – exact date TBC). Everyone is also welcomed to bring her/his jars home of course!

#4. Fermented Dancefloor & Late Night Fermentation Vibes (**Free Movement of Cultures**)
Playlist under construction -> add your ideas here: http://bit.ly/2lYI0cT

Entry is free —> BYOjars, foods, cultures, and other friends

 

For more info and updates: https://www.facebook.com/events/1275463755881579/

 

500womenscientists: Working to Empower Women in Science

Posted on Updated on

One of the newest organizations we’re excited about, the mission of 500 Women Scientists
is to promote a diverse and inclusive scientific community that brings progressive science-based solutions to local and global challenges.

What we love especially are their values, many that we share. We list theirs here and are working on ours (coming soon!):

  • Recognizing that science touches the lives of every person on this planet;
  • Advocating for a strong role of science in society;
  • Identifying and acknowledging structural inequities and biases in science;
  • Pushing for equality and standing up to inequality, discrimination, and aggression;
  • Pushing to develop and strengthen access for traditionally underrepresented groups to fully participate in and become leaders in science;
  • Supporting the education and careers of all scientists;
  • Enhancing scientific mentorship and encouraging an atmosphere of collaboration;
  • Stepping outside of our research disciplines to communicate our science and engage with the public;
  • Using the language and wonder of science to bridge the divides that separate societies and to enhance global diplomacy.

Check out the interview with Maryam Zaringhalam, a molecular biologist who describes herself as “floating at the intersection of art x science x society x advocacy x STEMinism”. She talks about her various interests and activities, and her insights as an Iranian-American on the recent travel ban. Great read!

 

Navjot Sodhi Conservation Research Award – Deadline Dec 31

Posted on

In remembrance of the contribution of late Dr. Navjot Sodhi to tropical conservation science, ATBC provides a cash award of 500 USD for a student from a developing country each year. Details at: http://tropcialbiology.org/navjot-sodhi-award.

 

Eligibility: ATBC student members who are nationals of a tropical developing country, conducting research that directly contributes to biodiversity conservation within the tropics.

Application materials:

1) A cover-letter as the main body of an e-mail, with name, nationality, current academic status, project title, and project location.

2) A single-page (400-800 words) document as an attachment, describing the research project, accomplishments to date (including any publication from the research), and specifically how the award will be used. (pdf  file attachment)

3) A letter of recommendation by the major academic advisor of the nominee, verifying the eligibility and explaining the significance of the nominee’s academic accomplishment and research potential (pdf file attachment or a separate e-mail directly submitted)

4) A curriculum vitae (pef attachment)

 

Please submit application materials as e-mail to president@tropicalbio.org by December 31.